Wednesday, November 07, 2007

More evidence of sun induced Global Warming

If CO2 emissions were the major cause of global warming then we would see constant increases in temperature across the day and night as the CO2 blanket keeps the heat inside our atmosphere. Scientific research has shown that this has occurred with both minimum and maximum temperature increasing.

We have pointed out time and time again how minimum temperatures are not a good indication of night time warming, especially when it rarely occurs at night.

But what about the rate of change of temperature anomalies between neighboring times? If CO2 was the major cause of global warming then we would see no significant difference in rate of change of temperature anomalies, in other words, all temperatures should increase equally. If the sun was a major cause of global warming then we would see no or limited changes at night, an increase int he rate of change approaching the middle of the day, and then a decreasing rate of change of temperature anomalies when the sun starts to lose its daytime strength.

So what do we find when looking at the data?

Rate of change in temperature anomalies between Midnight and 3am as well as 3am and 6am proved insignificant. However when the sun rises, we see a significant increase in the rate of change of temperature anomalies as compared to 6am. The increase is amplified int he last few years which, interestingly is the same period where maximum temperatures Australia wide have been high.



However rate of change of temperature anomalies at Noon was not significantly higher than 9am, nor 3pm compared to Noon (despite large cyclic variations in the latter). However when the sun starts to lose its power, the rate of change of temperature anomalies significantly decreases. The pattern in this decrease as shown below is strong and obvious.



Interestingly, 9pm saw significant increases in temperature as compared to 6pm, which goes against the Sun induced global warming theory. However there is no significant increase since 1960, and the rate of change of temperature anomalies from 9pm as a decreasing trend, although not quite significant in comparison to 9am, Noon and 3pm. Midnight had significant lower rate of change of temperature anomalies as compared to 9pm.

So what does all this mean? Well it shows once again that we are not having any changes in overnight temperatures despite increases in minimum temperature. The minimum is strongly influenced by the sun, and this shows in massive increases at 9am temperatures. Whilst temperatures have seen sudden increases at 9am, the increases have been constant throughout the day. But when the sun starts to lose its strength, we have seen a decreasing rate of change of temperature in comparison to neighboring times.

This shows the power of looking at temperatures at constant times of the day. Whilst maximum and minimum temperatures are increasing, we have shown that night time temperatures are not, and temperature increases are occurring moreso at and around 9am and decreasing in rate of change at 9pm.

A CO2 temperature blanket cannot be the cause of such results. The data points heavily towards sun induced global warming.

6 comments:

philip said...

Some interesting stuff on changes in cloud cover at the link below. Data is not specifically about Australia, but the author does think changes in cloud cover could well result from a decadal effect like PDO/ENSO.

Australian cloud cover data might show some interesting correlations with temperature.

http://meteora.ucsd.edu
/~jnorris/
presentations/Caltechweb.pdf

Luke said...

So have you adjusted for daylight saving time yet? And station moves to airports for regionals?

We now have the 3am data anomaly time series too and are working through the issues.

Pretty sparse data set IMO.

philip said...

Sparse data set, what does that mean?

Luke said...

There are very few stations worth analysing. It looks statistically dodgy. Need to let the boffins loose on it once we have the data sets organised.

Also some wit said if the data are captured at varying local daylight saving times which I think they are, you may have a first class mess.

Philip said...

Luke, as I suspected, you have no idea what the term sparse data set means. Someone else parroting stuff without understanding.

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